Ep. 10: Nike’s Online Sales | Valuing White Space vs. Realized Ambition

September 26, 2020 in Audio, Diary, Equities, Interviews, Podcast, This Week in Intelligent Investing

We are out with Season 1 Episode 10 of This Week in Intelligent Investing, featuring Elliot Turner of RGA Investment Advisors and Chris Bloomstran of Semper Augustus. Phil Ordway of Anabatic will be back in Episode 11.

Enjoy the conversation!

download audio recording

In this episode, John hosts a discussion of:

Part I: Nike’s surprising success with online sales — the durability of the direct-to-consumer opportunity, and what sets apart brands like Nike and Adidas from rival brands as well as top beverage brands; led by Chris Bloomstran

Part II: Valuing white space vs. realized ambition — how the market disproportionately rewards earlier-stage companies; the way TAMs collide and growth gets harder as companies scale; illustrated by Dropbox vs. Slack; led by Elliot Turner

Related Links

Part I:

Part II:

Follow Up

Would you like to follow up on this conversation?

Engage on Twitter with Chris, Elliot, or John.

Connect on LinkedIn with Chris, Elliot, or John.

This Week in Intelligent Investing is available on Amazon Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Podbean, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, and YouTube.

If you missed any past episodes, listen to them here.

About the Participants

Christopher P. Bloomstran, CFA , is the President and Chief Investment Officer of Semper Augustus Investments Group LLC. Chris has more than 25 years of investment experience with a value-driven approach to fundamental equity and industry research. At Semper Augustus, Chris directs all aspects of the firm’s research and portfolio management effort. Prior to forming Semper Augustus in 1998 – in the midst of the stock market and technology bubble – Chris was a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at UMB Investment Advisors. While at UMB Investment Advisors, Chris managed the Trust Investment offices in St. Louis and Denver. Among his investment duties at the firm, he managed the Scout Balanced Fund from the fund’s inception in 1995 until 1998, when he left to start Semper Augustus. Chris received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in Finance from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he also played football. He earned his Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation in 1994. Chris is a member of the CFA Society of St. Louis and of the CFA Institute. He has served on the Board of Directors of the CFA Society of St. Louis since 2002, where he was elected to sequential terms as Vice President from 2005 to 2006, President from 2006 to 2007 and Immediate Past President from 2007 to 2009. Chris has judged the Global Finals and the Americas Finals several times for CFA Institute’s University Global Investment Challenge. Chris served for a number of years as a member of the Bretton Woods Committee in Washington DC, an institution championing and raising awareness of the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization. He has also served on various not-for profit boards in St. Louis. His resides in St. Louis with his wife and two children.

Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy.

The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

Peter Cundill’s Thought Process on When to Sell

September 25, 2020 in Equities, Interviews, Skills, Video Excerpt

In an exclusive conversation with MOI Global, Tim McElvaine spoke about his mentor Peter Cundill’s approach to selling a stock.

About the interviewee:

Tim McElvaine is the founder and President of McElvaine Investment Management Ltd., investment advisor to The McElvaine Investment Trust. Tim developed his value-oriented philosophy during his 12-year career with Peter Cundill & Associates Ltd. where, amongst other capacities, he served as Manager of the Cundill Security Fund (1992-1999), Co-Manager of the Cundill Value Fund (1998-2003) and Chief Investment Officer (1998-2003). Tim had previously earned a Bachelor of Commerce from Queen’s University in 1986, qualified as a Chartered Accountant in 1988 and as a Chartered Financial Analyst in 1991. After working at Touche Ross in Toronto (1986-1989), Tim started his investment career with Bank of N.T. Butterfield in Bermuda (1989-1991) and joined Peter Cundill in 1991.

Tim has served on the Board of Directors of several publicly listed companies where The McElvaine Investment Trust held a significant investment including: Sun-Rype Products Ltd, Humpty Dumpty Snack Foods Inc, Rainmaker Entertainment Inc. and Glacier Media Inc.

Tim has been a speaker at value investing conferences including the Value Investing Seminar in Italy, Institute of Advanced Financial Planners Annual Symposium and The Ben Graham Centre’s Value Investing Conference in Toronto. In addition, Tim has appeared on BNN, Globe and Mail, Financial Post, Outstanding Investor Digest, The Manual of Ideas and has been featured in the investment book, Stock Market Superstars.

Owner-Operator Case Study: Matthew Miau and the MiTAC-Synnex Group

September 25, 2020 in Asia, Case Studies, Curated, Equities, Ideas, Jockey Stocks

This article is authored by MOI Global instructor Michael McGaughy, Head of Research and Portfolio Manager at Fusion Wealth Management Limited, based in Hong Kong.

Access Mike’s Minority Report blog for additional insights.

In my research and investing I stress three things: people, structure, and value. I look for companies that are controlled and managed by quality people, have corporate structures that align minority and majority shareholder interests and trade at valuations that are below fair value if not outright cheap.

This post is about people, namely Matthew Miau and the Miau family. It’s due to his pioneering and entrepreneurial efforts that Taiwan has become one of the world’s leading producers of high-technology products.

Surprisingly there’s very little written in English about the Miau family. In fact my introduction to him was through an investment in Istanbul listed Arena Bilgisayar Sanayi ve Ticaret SA (Arena). Arena is a subsidiary of Mumbai listed Redington India Ltd, whose largest shareholder is Taiwan listed Synnex Technology International Corp. All three are among the largest IT distributors in their respective regions.

US consumers and investors may have heard of their North American operation, Synnex Corporation, the third largest tech products distributor in North America as well as the second largest “CX’, or ‘customer experience’ company. It’s ranked 130 on the Fortune 500 list with sales of over USD23b in 2019 (see here). Synnex Coropration’s shares have been traded in the US since 2003.

While there’s not much written in English about them, the Miau family is well known in Taiwan. Group head Matthew Miau kindly wrote two autobiographies and there’s at least one other book on him and the group. Matthew’s father, and the clan’s patriarch, Miau Yu-Siou, was known in Taiwan as the ‘Flour King’.

My Chinese is pretty bad so the very capable Cindy Wan did the heavy lifting reading three books on the group. She also helped map their holdings and did extra work on the history of this very interesting business group and family.

Before TSMC[1]

This article is the combination of Cindy’s research on Synnex-MiTAC group and the review of the three books she read about the group: Win-win Strategy— The Story of Miau Feng-Chiang’s Strategic Alliances[2], Chess Game Win-Win— Miau, Feng-Chiang’s Global Strategy and MiTAC Inc—The Story of a Pioneer in Taiwan’s Computer Industry. Yours truly added some additional insight and is responsible for any mistakes or inaccuracies herein.

The books’ main focus is the origin and early development of Synnex-MiTAC Group, a Taiwan-based conglomerate, which represents the interests of the Miau Family. Gradually transforming into a technology-centric, albeit diversified group, the family’s initial company was a wheat milling and flour processing business. It was not until Matthew Miau started a business in the technology industry that the group expanded into technology. It is now one of the world’s largest distributors of technology products.

From Shandong flour to Silicon Valley high tech

The group could just as easily be referred to as the Lien Hwa group. Lien Hwa was established by Matthew Miau’s father Miau Yu-Siou. Born in 1919 in Shandong[3] he was involved in the flour and barley processing industry in Qingdao and Yantai before joining the 1949 KMT retreat from the Mainland at the end of China’s civil war. He founded Lien Hwa to mill flour and rice in 1951. It grew into one of Taiwan’s largest flour mills and today has a market share of over 20%. Yu-Siou actively promoted flour as a substitute carbohydrate to rice in Taiwan. By the time of his passing in 2004 he was locally known as, “The Father of Flour”, or “Flour King”. He was one of the prominent entrepreneurs in Taiwan’s early business circles and appears to have had a good relationship with the government which was extremely important during Taiwan’s long period under martial law (1949 to 1987)[4].

Not all rich kids are playboys

His father’s thriving flour business meant that Mathew Miau was born in a well-to-do family. This meant that he could study abroad – a luxury now but even more so in 1960’s Taiwan. He went to high school in Hong Kong and later the University of California at Berkeley, where he graduated with a bachelor degree in electrical engineering. One of his first jobs was at Intel, which in 1971 was a small start up where he rubbed shoulders with tech legends such as Andy Grove and Gordon Moore. He later got an MBA from Santa Clara University.

Family calling

Matthew moved back to Taiwan in 1976 to work for Union Petrochemical Corporation (UPC), in which family company Lien Hwa was a large investor.

Before leaving the US he asked for exclusive distribution rights for Intel microprocessors in Taiwan. However, these had already been awarded to MiTAC Inc, a start-up Taiwanese company founded by Hou Qing-Xiong and Lee Chen-Ying, electrical engineering classmates at the island’s top university, National Taiwan University. The two had invested NTD50 thousand respectively and got another NTD1.9 million from a family friend of Hou Qing-Xiang who owned an animal feed milling plant.

Originally established to distribute computers and perform systems integration work, MiTAC started to sell Intel’s microprocessors in Taiwan in 1975. At the time it was just a tiny team with about 12 employees and a total capital of NTD2 million, struggling to survive in an era when few people knew about computers, let alone microprocessors.

Sensing a good opportunity, Matthew sold his Intel shares and along with family money, invested USD150,000 in the struggling MiTAC. He became its largest investor, assumed the role of Chairman and oversaw management and financial planning. Matthew came with a lot of skills and experience. He had cutting edge technical knowledge and hands-on experience and relationships from his days at Intel. He also had an international background and outlook and, through family connections, a good relationship with Taiwan government officials. The MiTAC founders specialized in senior roles. Hou Qing-Xiong was responsible for business development, human resources and training. Lee Chen-Ying, was in charge of marketing and sales.

Taiwan’s pioneering tech company

MiTAC is likely the very first computer company in Taiwan – or at least one of the few that survived and is still around to claim bragging rights to being the first.

Like other startups, MiTAC did many things in its early days. It developed chips for various products such as washing machines, air conditioners and chemical factories. The company collaborated with Taiwan’s highway department to automate traffic systems and build highway display boards. It also made electronic systems for Taiwan’s growing agricultural industry. This included automating pig auctions and grain inventory. MiTAC computerized local consumer goods giant Uni-President’s payroll process and invented the world’s first Chinese computer interface, which was used by Taiwan’s tax, police and other government departments.

MiTAC continued to expand in the 1970s and 1980s before settling into three main business lines more-or-less organized into three companies. Systems Integration remained under MiTAC, computer manufacturing under MiTAC International and technology distribution under Synnex.

Overcoming hardship

The group didn’t always have a smooth path. As Taiwan’s tech industry grew it lost several early managers and employees to a talent shortage which occurred in the early 1980s. Foreign technology companies poached some of MiTAC’s best employees. It was a great loss for the company at that time.

One way to overcome the talent shortage was to recruit outside managers, which the group started to do in the mid-1980s. But things didn’t work out as they expected. According to the book, MiTAC Inc–The Story Of A Pioneer in Taiwan’s Computer Industry, the new managers had little understanding of both the group’s culture and the personal computer market in Taiwan. They were also not ready to be the hands-on, roll-up-their-sleeves guys to get things done like Matthew Miau and the older managers. The incident led Matthew Miau to place more emphasis on keeping and promoting from within rather than recruiting from outside.

Another crisis the group encountered also occurred in the 1980s. It was the era when the video gaming industry was booming in Taiwan. One of MiTAC Inc’s subsidiaries, Synnex Technology International, a distributor of electronic components, was selling many of its products to electronic game manufacturers. Reports of teenage addiction and their use in gambling led to harsh criticism of the games, and they were banned in the early 1980’s. As a result, many of their customers went out of business and Synnex’s debt load skyrocketed. Fortunately, MiTAC Inc had already built a strong foundation and was able to help its subsidiary survive the crisis.

Structure

The Synnex group has a large number of corporate entities. We counted over 400 companies, subsidiaries and associates in MiTAC-Synnex related firms.

In Taiwan the three main companies are Lien Hwa Holding, MiTAC Holding, and Synnex Tech International. The group’s original company, Lien Hwa Holding still mills flour and also oversees most of the group’s non-tech related businesses including petrochemicals and specialized industrial gases. But like virtually all companies in the group, it also has some tech businesses, which in Lien Hwa’s case includes its domestic system integration business. MiTAC Holding mostly holds the group’s manufacturing businesses including computers, fasteners, magnesium alloy and other technology products. Synnex Tech International is its holding company for the group’s vast electronic components distribution business. It has subsidiaries in India, the Middle East, Turkey and South-East Asia.

Outside of Taiwan the group’s key asset is it’s 10.2% stake in Synnex Corporation, which is its largest company by market capitalisation and revenue. At the end of June 2020 it’s USD5.8b accounted for 43.3% of the group’s total market capitalisation[5], and its USD24b in revenue last year made it the 130th largest company on the Fortune 500 list of the largest companies in the United States (see here). Synnex Corporation has two key businesses which, as this is being written, are due to be separated. Its electronics distribution business covers the parts of the world that its Taiwan-listed subsidiary does not: the Americas, Europe, Japan and South Korea. Its customer experience / digital services business is under Concentrix.

Complex in Taiwan. Simple outside.

Although not highlighted in the books Cindy read, she found that Synnex’s Taiwan entities appear to have a complex holding structure, particularly in the ownership and cross shareholdings of its eight Taiwan listed entities (see ownership structure below).

There are also many instances where we were unable to determine ultimate control of certain companies. The paper trail from our cursory research effort went dead. There is also substantial overlap among group companies with several engaged in the same business, albeit in different locations.

This contrasts with the relatively straightforward structure of its overseas subsidiaries and associates. As seen below, Synnex invested Redington’s corporate structure is relatively straight forward (from their website. See here).

Mr. JV.

Taiwan’s local press many times refers to Matthew Miau as “Mr. Joint-Venture”, or “JV King” as many companies were acquired or started as JV’s. He believed that multinational strategic alliances embodied his idea of “make full use of limited resources and do unlimited business.”[6] For example, Synnex Tech International was established as a joint venture in 1988 between MiTAC group and Lex Services, a UK company that began life as an automobile factory, eventually becoming one of the largest distributors of electronic components and computer systems in Europe. The predecessor of Linde LienHwa, BOC Lien Hwa Industrial Co., Ltd., was founded in 1985 as a joint venture between Lien Hwa Industrial Corporation and UK’s BOC Group Plc., one of the world’s largest industrial gas suppliers. GeTac Technology Corporation was established as a joint-venture between the group and GE Aerospace (50%-50%).

This pattern continues into the 2000’s. Between 2001 and 2018, the US-listed Synnex Corporation made 23 acquisitions of companies outside of the group.

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Episode 9: Generalist Investing | Stock Compensation | Golden Age of Fraud

September 18, 2020 in Audio, Diary, Equities, Interviews, Podcast, This Week in Intelligent Investing

We are out with Season 1 Episode 9 of This Week in Intelligent Investing, featuring Elliot Turner of RGA Investment Advisors, Phil Ordway of Anabatic Investment Partners, and Chris Bloomstran of Semper Augustus.

Enjoy the conversation!

download audio recording

In this episode, John hosts a discussion of:

  • Investing as a generalist — a manifesto: the advantages (and potential drawbacks) of being a generalist investor and taking a generalist mindset to life; led by Elliot Turner [related book]
  • Employee options and repurchases: the “games” companies play when it comes to doling out stock-based compensation and using buybacks to offset dilution; led by Chris Bloomstran
  • The golden age of fraud: Jim Chanos has called our time the “golden age” of corporate fraud, and a “fake it till you make it” attitude seems to have become more pervasive; led by Phil Ordway [related paper]

Follow Up

Would you like to follow up on this conversation?

Engage on Twitter with Chris, Elliot, Phil, or John.

Connect on LinkedIn with Chris, Elliot, Phil, or John.

This Week in Intelligent Investing is available on Amazon Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Podbean, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, and YouTube.

If you missed any past episodes, listen to them here.

About the Participants

Christopher P. Bloomstran, CFA , is the President and Chief Investment Officer of Semper Augustus Investments Group LLC. Chris has more than 25 years of investment experience with a value-driven approach to fundamental equity and industry research. At Semper Augustus, Chris directs all aspects of the firm’s research and portfolio management effort. Prior to forming Semper Augustus in 1998 – in the midst of the stock market and technology bubble – Chris was a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at UMB Investment Advisors. While at UMB Investment Advisors, Chris managed the Trust Investment offices in St. Louis and Denver. Among his investment duties at the firm, he managed the Scout Balanced Fund from the fund’s inception in 1995 until 1998, when he left to start Semper Augustus. Chris received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in Finance from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he also played football. He earned his Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation in 1994. Chris is a member of the CFA Society of St. Louis and of the CFA Institute. He has served on the Board of Directors of the CFA Society of St. Louis since 2002, where he was elected to sequential terms as Vice President from 2005 to 2006, President from 2006 to 2007 and Immediate Past President from 2007 to 2009. Chris has judged the Global Finals and the Americas Finals several times for CFA Institute’s University Global Investment Challenge. Chris served for a number of years as a member of the Bretton Woods Committee in Washington DC, an institution championing and raising awareness of the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization. He has also served on various not-for profit boards in St. Louis. His resides in St. Louis with his wife and two children.

Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department.

Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy.

The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

Co-Founder Jim Sinegal on the Costco Story and Business Model

September 17, 2020 in Curated, Equities, Full Video, Interviews, North America, Transcripts

We are pleased to share the following conversation with Jim Sinegal, co-founder and former CEO of Costco Wholesale Corporation (Nasdaq: COST). The interview took place in November 2019.

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Jim Sinegal.

John Malone on His Business and Capital Allocation Philosophy

September 16, 2020 in Curated, Equities, Full Video, Interviews, North America, Transcripts

We are pleased to share the following lecture and Q&A with John Malone of Liberty Media. The event took place in 2012.

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About:

John Malone.

Episode 8: Blind Valuation | Sports Betting | The Imperative of No

September 12, 2020 in Audio, Diary, Equities, Interviews, Podcast, This Week in Intelligent Investing

We are out with Season 1 Episode 8 of This Week in Intelligent Investing, featuring Elliot Turner of RGA Investment Advisors, Phil Ordway of Anabatic Investment Partners, and Chris Bloomstran of Semper Augustus.

Enjoy the conversation!

download audio recording

In this episode, John hosts a discussion of:

  • A new “blind valuation” exercise, with an analysis of equity valuation based on the numbers alone [download financials]; led by Phil Ordway
  • An overview of the sports betting industry, including size, growth, regulation, and selected ideas; led by Elliot Turner
  • The imperative of “no”: the luxury of patience — key points from a talk at The Zurich Project 2019; led by Chris Bloomstran

Follow Up

Would you like to follow up on this conversation?

Engage on Twitter with Chris, Elliot, and Phil.

Connect on LinkedIn with Chris, Elliot, and Phil.

This Week in Intelligent Investing is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Podbean, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, and YouTube.

If you missed any past episodes, listen to them here.

About the Participants

Christopher P. Bloomstran, CFA , is the President and Chief Investment Officer of Semper Augustus Investments Group LLC. Chris has more than 25 years of investment experience with a value-driven approach to fundamental equity and industry research. At Semper Augustus, Chris directs all aspects of the firm’s research and portfolio management effort. Prior to forming Semper Augustus in 1998 – in the midst of the stock market and technology bubble – Chris was a Vice President and Portfolio Manager at UMB Investment Advisors. While at UMB Investment Advisors, Chris managed the Trust Investment offices in St. Louis and Denver. Among his investment duties at the firm, he managed the Scout Balanced Fund from the fund’s inception in 1995 until 1998, when he left to start Semper Augustus. Chris received his Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in Finance from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he also played football. He earned his Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation in 1994. Chris is a member of the CFA Society of St. Louis and of the CFA Institute. He has served on the Board of Directors of the CFA Society of St. Louis since 2002, where he was elected to sequential terms as Vice President from 2005 to 2006, President from 2006 to 2007 and Immediate Past President from 2007 to 2009. Chris has judged the Global Finals and the Americas Finals several times for CFA Institute’s University Global Investment Challenge. Chris served for a number of years as a member of the Bretton Woods Committee in Washington DC, an institution championing and raising awareness of the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization. He has also served on various not-for profit boards in St. Louis. His resides in St. Louis with his wife and two children.

Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department.

Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy.

The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.